The new kettle…

It’s been a long time  coming but it’s here and finished. I had a Bayou Classic 24 quart that I used for some time but wanted a heavier kettle and wanted to add some features. Like the Bayou this one has a stainless mesh basket that I really enjoy over bags.

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This brewing kettle began as a $70 “open box” Amazon Warehouse Deal Winco SSDB-20 20 quart double boiler. 20 quart size works fine for my small 1 to 2-1/2 gallon batches but for an occasional 3 gallon batch I will need to mash thicker and rinse sparge to top off to my desired pre-boil volume which I’m ok with. To start the kettle build I had Chad at Arbor Fab modify the double boiler insert by cutting the bulk of it off and creating an extended stainless mesh basket. As you can tell from the pictures they do awesome work. One reason for going with the stainless mesh over a bag was increased flow-thru for recirculating and quick draining. Super easy cleanup too, flip it over and rinse it off. I guess you’d call it Brew In A Basket.

Click here to visit Arbor Fabricating

To allow for recirculating I silver brazed in a 1/2″ triclamp fitting on the top ring of the insert. I have never had much luck with silver soldering but I found flux-coated silver brazing rods to be very easy to get great results. As with silver soldering there is a little flux clean up but not bad.

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For monitoring the wort flow I put together a recirculation assembly with surplus mini-triclamp fittings including a sight glass and valve to adjust the flow. Why? Well if for no other reason than to watch the wonderful wort go by but it also allows me to monitor flow and clarity. Part of the reason the build took so long was finding the mini-triclamp pieces at a cheap price…thank you eBay lol. I went with triclamp fittings due to the fact that, after working in a small brewery many years ago, I saw how sanitary they are, thus easy to clean and they simply do not leak. To make everything easier I have made custom length silicone hoses for my system and brew cart with the mini-triclamp fittings.

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To disperse the returning wort on top of the grain I wanted to try different methods to see what their effectiveness is so I created a few different recirculation fittings. One is a simple piece of silicone tubing that will rest on top of the grain, another is a simple shower head design and another is a perforated tube that will go all the way down into the grain and return wort throughout the mash (very similar to how the Brew Boss COFI system works, a very interesting concept). I’ll report back as to how they all work.

For heat I used a 2000W element from my Bayou kettle. I got a couple of them a few years back on clearance from a home brew supplier in Idaho that unfortunately no longer carries them but I have had great success with them. No problem boiling 3-4 gallons and if you’re patient even 5 gallons without scorching. They originally had a severely under-sized cord on them with no ground provision (probably why they were on clearance) so I made an enclosure that allowed the important grounding as well as adding a larger 12 gauge cord. The element installs the same as most 1/2″ NPT weldless fittings in a 13/16″ hole but with a flat silicone washer instead of an o-ring. It can be quickly and easily removed for a more thorough cleaning if needed. With the flat silicone washers repeated disassembly is possible without leaks. O-rings tend to lose their shape and/or squish out from behind fittings.

For temperature control there is an Auber Instrument RTD weldless probe in the kettle wall and one in the recirculation path that connect to my controller (featured here https://stainlessbrewer.wordpress.com/2016/09/01/the-over-engineered-brewing-controller/). I also have a Brew Boss temperature probe that I modified to use in the recirculation path with a triclamp fitting.

To monitor water and wort volumes I made a sight glass and calibrated it to the kettle with markings every 1/4 gallon. It is made from 1/2″ diameter polycarbonate tubing and stainless compression fittings with a vent at the top that can be removed to scrub the tube if needed. The sight glass guard is a piece of aluminum channel intended to be used as edging on 1/2″ plywood but fits snuggly on the tube and is where I stuck the graduation markings for the liquid levels. The markings are easily seen through the tube and when liquid is in the sight glass they appear magnified…great for my “getting older vision”.

The drain is a Blichmann drain bulkhead and 1/2″ three piece ball valve with triclamp adapter. With the Blichmann drain bulkhead and their ball valve the valve threads right up against the wall of the kettle and seals great without pipe tape thanks to their captive o-ring in a washer allowing for a more compact drain valve assembly. If needed I can use their dip tube with the bulkhead fitting, just like on their Boilermaker line of kettles, but I was able to mount it low enough I don’t think it’ll be needed.

To aid in lifting the basket and to support it while it drains and if I rinse sparge I made a handle out of a nylon web handle from an old duffle bag and a couple stainless clips. I also made a few supports for the basket that simply hang over the side of the kettle and support the basket about an inch and a half into the kettle to avoid drips.

While the wort drains I wanted to have a way to squeeze all the sweet wort from the grains, like those of you that squeeze the grain bag, so I made a press plate out of a piece of cutting board that I cut to just fit inside the basket.

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Since I like to “clean in place” by recirculating hot PBW solution I installed a mini-triclamp fitting in the lid that a mini spray ball can be attached. Although it is a relatively small kettle it is still rather heavy so I let PBW and a pump take care of the post-brew day cleanup. Quick rinse with kitchen sink sprayer and then a gallon or so of hot PBW solution and let recirculate for 20 minutes or so. Very little scrubbing, if none at all, is needed and it also cleans all the fittings, tubing and pump in the process. It also provides a place for a dial thermometer to rest for double checking mash temps if desired.

This build was a challenge but very rewarding at the same time. Over-engineered? Yep, but if you know me that is how I do things lol. Realistically it is a very basic build but offers a lot of flexibility and with my experimental brewing style it works great for me.

I hope everyone can use something from this build or it sparked some thought for your own kettle build.

Here is a link to my YouTube video of the kettle in action on a recent brew day… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F96P8MYNDrg

Thank you for checking out my blog and subscribe to receive notifications of new posts! Also a “stainlessbrewer” Facebook page is coming soon.

Cheers

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6 thoughts on “The new kettle…

  1. Love the setup. Both old and new.

    Do you know what micron was used for your basket, and are you you happy with it?
    I am going in a similar direction and have been in contact with Arbor Fab to modify a Bayou classic basket. They have 300 and 400 micron mesh.

    Also, will you be using the same controller configuration for the new kettle?
    Looking for something that I can control from PC/tablet. As well as display on a screen in the brewery (just because). So far the BCS controllers look to have the most support, but some of the newer Raspberry Pi and Arduino setups look to be promising.

    Cheers

    • I went with the 400 micron on this one just like the first one. I am very pleased with it, great flow through/drains quick and cleans easy. The original controller went with the original kettle when I sold it and the new owner is happy as well. I have built a new controller and did a post to the blog last week about it, check it out.
      If you are going with a single vessel system and want tablet control you might want to check out the Brew Boss, a little more money but solid support. BCS is the only other one right now that has a fair amount of support. The BCS program lays the ground work and can be customized. Rasp Pi and Arduino hardware is inexpensive and straight forward but the software stuff out there is pretty much all open source so you have to be comfortable with serious DIY and doing your own troubleshooting. Nothing against them and some cool stuff has been done but, from personal experience, the Arduino community’s support comes and goes in waves and is not consistent.

  2. Which of the recirculation fittings did you end up going with? You said you were trying several to disperse wort through you grains. And other than the silicone tube, where did you get them from or did you make them?

    • After several brews and trying the different fittings I saw little difference. I would have to attribute this to the great flow through characteristics of the mesh basket. All the batches hit their numbers so I tend to use the simplest method with the hose. The fitting arm that has all the holes did tend to keep the mash loose and I can see the benefit of that especially with a wheat beer. I made all the fittings.

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